URGENT ACTION NEEDED: Justice For Cecily McMillan!

OccupyMN – The People’s Movement __________ URGENT ISSUE: *Nearly 150,000 people are demanding the release of Cecily McMillan. Are you one of them? *Additional Information ========== NEARLY 150,000 PEOPLE ARE DEMANDING THE RELEASE OF CECILY MCMILLAN. ARE YOU ONE OF THEM? __________ Justice betrayed! Cecily McMillan is a young woman who was sexually assaulted and then falsely arrested by a NYC police officer! She is a committed social justice advocate with no prior criminal history, yet she was then convicted of assaulting HIM and may be sentenced to seven years in jail? The court process showed clear bias on the part of Judge Zweibel in favor of the prosecution. Evidence of the officer’s prior acts of aggression and falsification of evidence was not allowed. Video of rampant police brutality against peaceful Occupy Wall Street protesters who were gathering just to socialize the night of March 17, 2012 was not allowed. Cecily is now at RIKER’S with NO BAIL, and has a sentencing hearing on Monday May 19. She is not an elopement risk! She is a graduate student who plans to write her thesis on Civil Rights leader Bayard Rustin! The police were not peaceful that night and justice has not been served. 9 of the 12 jurors who sat on the jury to hear her case have even said in writing “We would ask the court to consider probation with community service. We feel that the felony mark on Cecily’s record is punishment enough.” Governor Cuomo and Mayor de […]

Why We Occupy

By: Sam Wagner [Sam Wagner - Radical News Media and Photography] It makes me happy to see you are here reading this. If you made it to this website it demonstrates to me the many threads we all have in common. You’ll have to please excuse my tone throughout this article. I’ll be honest with you all, I’ve lost two friends to suicide within the last week and I am in a period of reflection. I am a human being, a son, and a brother. I am also an OccupyMN media activist, but I’ve done work with many different organizations; including the Minneapolis Chapter of the Zeitgeist Movement. I’ve taken pictures of actions put together by WAMM, Vets for Peace, Idle No More and others. I am , what I would consider, a revolutionary. An amalgam of profoundly new ideas, just waiting to be shared. It matters not what each of our ideal social systems are, so long as we recognize that there is a problem that requires drastic action. I am going to write today about “Why We Occupy”. This is a difficult question, as we all know we come from different backgrounds, situations, and places, the answer would be different to every one of us. So before we can begin to answer that question, I should first start by asking “What do YOU think, when you hear the word Occupy?” Again, mixed answers. So let’s start with the political movement, Occupy Wall Street. In 2011, after many months, […]

Occupy Anniversary Special: Highlights, Pitfalls and the Shifting of Public Consciousness

Abby Martin remarks on the tragic mass shooting that took place in Washington, DC, posing the question of how many more it will take to finally have a debate fueled by reality, not politics. Then second anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, highlighting a recent Reuters poll showing that only 15 percent of Americans are satisfied with the government’s effort to prosecute Wall Street bankers. Former Philadelphia police captain Ray Lewis speaks about why he chose to protest in-uniform at Occupy. Then a look at the successes and shortcomings of the Occupy movement, featuring a panel discussion between RT’s Anastasia Churkina, Ramon Galindo and Manuel Rapalo. Finally, a personal tribute to Occupy and how the movement isn’t dead, because shifting the public consciousness is not something that ever goes away. Source: RT America

Supressing OWS: How the Police Use Arrests to Disrupt Peaceful Assemblies

On the eve of the second anniversary of the Occupy movement, two video activists, have released a 10 minute short film providing perhaps the most detailed civilian account to date of the NYPD’s process of crowd dispersion during mass mobilizations. The video, shot on September 17th, 2012, during Occupy Wall Street’s first anniversary celebration action, details 10 arrests that took place over the span of 87 minutes. While at first glance many of the individual arrests appear to be arbitrary, careful analysis from the videographers illustrates a larger picture wherein the NYPD’s actions are calculated and designed to derail the protestors ability to effectively assemble. This video is a powerful resource for activists of all stripes in New York City. Please watch it, share it, carefully examine the NYPD’s process in it, and use it to inoculate yourself from their coordinated attempts to stifle your first amendment protections. “On the eve of the second anniversary of OWS it bears remembering that the occupations didn’t simply fizzle and dissipate,” says Paul Sullivan, who videotaped the police response, “this video, shot last year on the morning of the first anniversary, not only reminds us of how difficult it is to protest when the NYPD is determined to shut you down, but also how the NYPD continues to suppress civil liberties in order to stamp out the movement.” Read More: http://www.sparrowmedia.net/2013/09/nypd-s17-occupy-wall-street-10-arrests/

Movements Without Leaders & Climate Change

Movements Without Leaders In recent months -- and it’s the curse of an author that sometimes you change your mind after your book is in type -- I’ve come to like the idea of capital L leaders less and less. It seems to me to miss the particular promise of this moment: that we could conceive of, and pursue, movements in new ways. The history we grow up with shapes our sense of reality -- it's hard to shake. If you were young during the fight against Nazism, war seems a different, more virtuous animal than if you came of age during Vietnam. I was born in 1960, and so the first great political character of my life was Martin Luther King, Jr. I had a shadowy, child's sense of him when he was still alive, and then a mythic one as his legend grew; after all, he had a national holiday. As a result, I think, I imagined that he set the template for how great movements worked. They had a leader, capital L. As time went on, I learned enough about the civil rights movement to know it was much more than Dr. King. There were other great figures, from Ella Baker and Medgar Evers to Bob Moses, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Malcolm X, and there were tens of thousands more whom history doesn't remember but who deserve great credit. And yet one's early sense is hard to dislodge: the civil rights movement had his face […]