Occupy Toronto user pics

Some cool Occupy Toronto images: The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa…

More Occupy Toronto photos

Check out these Occupy Toronto images: The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa… The Royal Canadian Navy Show: “Meet the Navy”: Herbert C. Barber Image by bill barber In 1943/44 my dad, who was enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy, travelled with the Navy Show which was entitled, "Meet the Navy". Not sure he was actually in the cast, so I’ll have to pull his file at Archives Canada in Ottawa. Since he was a Certified Public Accountant, he might have watched the books. The show went across Canada by train. I know that Dad was not with the production that went overseas in 1945. Dad is second from the right in the above photo. Here’s the story of the Navy Show: From my Herbert Charles Barber Collection www.flickr.com/photos/21861018@N00/collections/7215760076… "Meet the Navy" was a Royal Canadian Navy musical revue produced during World War II under the supervision of Capt Joseph P. Connolly, director of Special Services for the RCN. Rehearsals began in June 1943 at Hart House in Toronto. The production staff and company were recognized officially, though somewhat after the fact, by a Government of Canada Treasury Board order-in-council, 13 Aug 1943, as ‘an Establishment to be known as "The Navy Show" for the… Entertainment of Naval, Army and Air Force personnel on Active Service; Promotion of recruiting; [and] Maintenance of public morale and goodwill’. The show itself, called "Meet the Navy" and directed by Louis Silver (a Hollywood producer) and Larry Ceballos (a Broadway choreographer), was premiered for servicemen 2 September at Toronto’s Victoria Theatre and opened to the public 4 September. It opened in Ottawa 15 September at the Capitol Theatre (Ottawa). During a year-long national tour, which covered some 10,000 miles by train, Meet the Navy entertained about a half-million Canadians. It travelled in 1944 to Britain, opening 23 October in Glasgow and touring England (11 cities in the provinces), Ireland, and Wales and playing at the Hippodrome in London (1 Feb-7 Apr 1945, including a command performance 28 February). Performances followed in Paris’ Théâtre Marigny, the Brussels Music Hall, and Amsterdam’s Carré Theatre. Meet the Navy closed 12 September in Oldenburg in occupied Germany. In 1945 the National Film Board produced the film Meet the Navy on Tour. Though plans for a Broadway run fell through, the show itself was filmed in November in Britain. Meet the Navy included skits, dance routines, and several songs: ‘In Your Little Chapeau,’ ‘Rockettes and the Wrens,’ ‘Brothers-in-Arms,’ ‘Meet the Navy,’ and ‘Beauty on Duty,’ all by R.W. Harwood (words) and P.E. Quinn (music); ‘The Boys in the Bellbottom Trousers’ by Quinn; ‘Shore Leave’ by Noel Langley and Henry Sherman (words) and Quinn; and the showstopper (sung by John Pratt) ‘You’ll Get Used to It’, with words by Pratt to music by Freddy Grant. Eric Wild (who conducted the pit orchestra) and Robert Russell Bennett arranged the music. Leading roles were taken by Pratt, Robert Goodier, Cameron Grant, and Lionel Merton. Other featured performers included Dixie Dean, Ivan Romanoff (who conducted a balalaika orchestra and a chorus in ‘Scena Russki’), Carl Tapscott (who did choral arrangements), the bass Oscar Natzke, and the dance team Alan and Blanche Lund. Members of the 25-piece orchestra included the violinists Victor Feldbrill, Bill Richards, and Joseph Sera, the trombonist Ted Elfstrom, and the saxophonist-clarinetist Howard ‘Cokie’ Campbell. After the London debut of Meet the Navy, Beverley Baxter wrote in the London Evening Standard: ‘Why is this piece so exhilarating, so completely satisfying and, since the first class always touches the emotions, why was it so stirring? Perhaps the answer is that quite outside the professional slickness and the terrific pace of the whole thing, we were seeing the story of Canada unconsciously unfolding itself to our eyes’. In 1980, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Canadian navy, the Nova Scotia government revived Meet the Navy with several members of the original cast. Phillips, Ruth. ‘The history of the Royal Canadian Navy’s World War II show Meet the Navy,’ unpublished manuscript (1973) Southworth, Jean. ‘Actor revives his wartime role,’ Ottawa Journal, 19 Aug 1980 From: The Encyclopaedia of Music in Canada www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Pa…

Great Occupy Toronto images

Some cool Occupy Toronto images: Union Bank/TD Bank campaign, 1987 Image by Heritage Vancouver From our massive campaign in 1987 against the proposed demolition of the 1919-1920 Union Bank Building (TD Bank Bldg), located at 560 Hastings Street and Seymour. Architects were Somervell and Putnam. Vancouver was so close in losing the building, that a demolition permit was issued, and plans were underway for the demolition. Luckily, and with considerable work, it survived, was restored, and is now the Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue, part of Simon Fraser University. Pictured here in the 1987 photo is Jim Kerr (left), Alderman Gordon Price (centre rear), and Anthony Norfolk (top hat) who’s currently leading our Advocacy Group in 2011. Designed by the architects Somervell and Putnam and constructed between 1919 and 1920, the building served as local headquarters of the Union Bank for only six years. It then was occupied by the Bank of Toronto and the Toronto Dominon Bank for the remainder of the time. The building is one of three so-called ‘temple banks’ in Vancouver which derive their proportions and detailing from the style of Greco-Roman temples. It was customary for the banks of the time to favour the use of this kind of historical motif to evoke a sense of security and stability, which appealed to the conservative nature of the bankers. It’s also a fine example of Second Renaissance architecture, which had become popular for large houses, apartments, schools and commercial buildings. This architectural style features a strong horizontal emphasis; wide bracketed cornices; and a variation of window shape or decorative trim for each of several floors. Photo by Ed Olson Hanging our heads in shame Image by Swamibu View large The world should hang it’s head in shame. Gaza has become "hell on earth" for its 1.5 million inhabitants [John Ging, head of the United Nations refugee agency in Gaza] “Who for a minute thinks we can take care of one and half million people in three hours, when before it was a full time job for 10,000 people?” [John Ging, head of the United Nations refugee agency in Gaza] “A three-hour ceasefire to go and see whether your mum and dad are alive is not a humanitarian corridor, it’s a tea break for the soldiers.” [Western NGO worker] The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good. [Samuel Johnson] A group of eight Jewish-Canadian women successfully occupied the Israeli Consulate in Toronto today. "We felt so strongly about protesting this terrible violence against the Palestinian people" said Smadar Carmon, "that we decided to take extraordinary action. We hope others, Jews and non-Jews will follow our lead and speak out against the Israeli massacres, the on-going siege and in solidarity with the people of Gaza." [January 7th 2009] May Day Image by Pagla Dashu পাগলা দাশু Over 1200 people in Toronto came out to support May day this year with several actions and protests taking place in the annual festival of workers rights. Concurrent demonstrations also took place in other parts of Canada. Similar to 2012, a small contingent began gardening in a small patch at Queens Park. Occupy Gardens provided training, dances, speeches and hot food to dozens of protesters who eventually dug up the sod and grass and began creating a makeshift garden on the grounds of the legislature planting peas, garlic, onions, kale, lettuce and radishes. The day’s main rally and march gathered at City Hall hours later. Dozens of groups joined the protest, led by a group carrying a two row wampum. Organizers talked about deaths in Bangladesh, the work of No One is Illegal around Sanctuary City and the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty’s (OCAP) work around shelter beds in the City of Toronto. This years march focused on solidarity actions with garment workers in Bangladesh and striking workers at Porter Airlines. (Source: toronto.mediacoop.ca/story/may-day-alive-and-well-toronto…) N.B.- The photo in the poster was taken by GMB Akash. PICT0045 Image by Harrattan Parhar

Nice Occupy Toronto photos

A few nice Occupy Toronto images I found: Battle Royal… over Image by Sweet One I wasn’t willing to wait 45 minutes in line to get in… so when I got back around 6 am, it was over! Battle Royal, 2009 Shaun El C. Leonardo – New York City, USA Performance Art Inspired by Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man, 20 men will enter Toronto’s original bus depot with lingering art-deco design and step into a 17’ steel cage. Shaun El Conquistador Leonardo (artist and trained fighter) along with 19 of Canada’s elite pro-wrestlers will fight blindfolded until only one man is left standing. The match is an intense, theatrical recreation of the book’s opening scene also entitled Battle Royal. Occupying a space between literary representation, wrestling spectacle and art performance, Battle Royal is an unscripted event harkening back to the actual fight to-the-end bouts African Americans were encouraged to enter for prize winnings during post-slavery American South; while manifesting the artist’s own personal fear of societal invisibility. Beginning at 7pm members of the audience are invited to be blindfolded and escorted into the cage where they will have the opportunity to feel the intimidation and potential of aggression Battle Royal encompasses. Gradually, as the night reaches its peak, professional wrestlers will be introduced to the ring, initiating the action while the artist, Shaun El C. Leonardo, seeks to withstand the pain, embarrassment and discomfort of struggling in front of eyes without having sight himself. Battle Royal… over Image by Sweet One I wasn’t willing to wait 45 minutes in line to get in… so when I got back around 6 am, it was over! Battle Royal, 2009 Shaun El C. Leonardo – New York City, USA Performance Art Inspired by Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man, 20 men will enter Toronto’s original bus depot with lingering art-deco design and step into a 17’ steel cage. Shaun El Conquistador Leonardo (artist and trained fighter) along with 19 of Canada’s elite pro-wrestlers will fight blindfolded until only one man is left standing. The match is an intense, theatrical recreation of the book’s opening scene also entitled Battle Royal. Occupying a space between literary representation, wrestling spectacle and art performance, Battle Royal is an unscripted event harkening back to the actual fight to-the-end bouts African Americans were encouraged to enter for prize winnings during post-slavery American South; while manifesting the artist’s own personal fear of societal invisibility. Beginning at 7pm members of the audience are invited to be blindfolded and escorted into the cage where they will have the opportunity to feel the intimidation and potential of aggression Battle Royal encompasses. Gradually, as the night reaches its peak, professional wrestlers will be introduced to the ring, initiating the action while the artist, Shaun El C. Leonardo, seeks to withstand the pain, embarrassment and discomfort of struggling in front of eyes without having sight himself. Image by John Brownlow Century farmhouse, Airport Road. Now occupied by a sikh family. The land around it is under is being developed as tract housing.